Report Bias

If you are visiting this page, you or someone you know is likely hurting after experiencing a bias and hate incident on campus. That should never be part of The Wisconsin Experience and we want address the issue and provide you with resources you might need.

The University of Wisconsin-Madison values a diverse community where all members are able to participate fully in The Wisconsin Experience. Incidents of bias and hate affecting a person or group create a hostile climate and negatively impact the quality of The Wisconsin Experience for community members. UW-Madison takes such incidents seriously and will investigate and respond to reported or observed incidents of bias.

If an emergency has occurred please call 911.


Report an Incident of Bias

Our online reporting form is secure and confidential.

What is the official definition of bias?

Definition of bias and hate: Single or multiple acts toward an individual, group, or their property that are so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive that they create an unreasonably intimidating, hostile, or offensive work, learning, or program environment, and that one could reasonably conclude are based upon actual or perceived age, race, color, creed, religion, gender identity or expression, ethnicity, national origin, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, political affiliation, marital status, spirituality, cultural, socio-economic status, or any combination of these or other related factors. Bias and hate incidents include, but are not limited to the following, when they rise to the level of the standard set forth above: slurs, degrading language, epithets, graffiti, vandalism, intimidation, symbols, and harassment that are directed toward or affect the targeted individual or team. Incidents of bias and hate contribute to a hostile campus environment and can occur even if the act itself is unintentional or delivered as a joke, prank, or having humorous intent.

The above definition is used for reporting and statistical purpose only. It carries no independent sanctioning weight or authority.

Although the expression of an idea or point of view may be offensive or inflammatory to some, it is not necessarily a violation of law or university policy. The university values and embraces the ideals of freedom of inquiry, freedom of thought, and freedom of expression, all of which must be vitally sustained in a community of scholars. While these freedoms protect controversial ideas and differing views, and sometimes even offensive and hurtful words, they do not protect acts of misconduct that violate criminal law or university policy.

What are examples of bias incidents?

Incidents of bias and hate can include, but are not limited to: slurs, degrading language, epithets, graffiti, vandalism, intimidation, symbols, and harassment; that are directed toward or affect the targeted individual or group. Bias and hate incidents are those that are based upon actual or perceived age, race, color, creed, religion, gender identity or expression, ethnicity, national origin, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, political affiliation, marital status, spirituality, cultural, socio-economic status, or any combination of these or other related factors.